jeremy paul gordon

I work for Pitchfork and also write for the Wall Street Journal, GQ, Pacific Standard and others. E-mail me at jeremypaulgordon[at]gmail[dot]com or check out my vaguely professional personal website. I'm also on Twitter.

November 20, 2012 at 2:44pm
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"Watching Federer pick apart the clearly overmatched Belgian, it occurred to me that what the game’s training academy couldn’t teach me, I could pick up from the most obvious source: The actual, real life tennis matches. Simply keeping an eye on where the players stood, where they moved, and which types of shots they used in different situations was more instructive than playing things out in the videogame, where I was likely to lose again and again without learning much, given the speed of the matches. On the other hand, watching Wimbledon was like watching two highly skilled Top Spin players go at it — except, of course, that they were real, breathing human beings. A master like Federer, vying for his record seventh Wimbledon title, unlocked the game’s possibilities in ways I’d never considered. Controlled by my human hands, he was stiff and hesitant; on the greens of the All England Club, he moved with ferocious grace, effortlessly pacing the court and swinging his racket like it was an extension of his arm.”
I also wrote a thing for Kill Screen about Top Spin 4 and how it helped me get into tennis.

"Watching Federer pick apart the clearly overmatched Belgian, it occurred to me that what the game’s training academy couldn’t teach me, I could pick up from the most obvious source: The actual, real life tennis matches. Simply keeping an eye on where the players stood, where they moved, and which types of shots they used in different situations was more instructive than playing things out in the videogame, where I was likely to lose again and again without learning much, given the speed of the matches. On the other hand, watching Wimbledon was like watching two highly skilled Top Spin players go at it — except, of course, that they were real, breathing human beings. A master like Federer, vying for his record seventh Wimbledon title, unlocked the game’s possibilities in ways I’d never considered. Controlled by my human hands, he was stiff and hesitant; on the greens of the All England Club, he moved with ferocious grace, effortlessly pacing the court and swinging his racket like it was an extension of his arm.”

I also wrote a thing for Kill Screen about Top Spin 4 and how it helped me get into tennis.

Notes

  1. unwordinglanguage reblogged this from airgordon and added:
    Here’s a great article I found. It focuses on the relationship between playing a tennis video game and watching tennis...
  2. sport-weed-sex reblogged this from airgordon
  3. theunspokenemotions reblogged this from airgordon
  4. airgordon posted this