jeremy paul gordon

I work for Pitchfork and also write for the Wall Street Journal, GQ, Pacific Standard and others. E-mail me at jeremypaulgordon[at]gmail[dot]com or check out my vaguely professional personal website. I'm also on Twitter.

April 9, 2012 at 11:06am
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Reblogged from bbook
bbook:

Mauro Remiddi, aka Porcelain Raft, has been around the block and then some. Born in 1972, he toured all over the world before recently settling in New York City, where he recorded Porcelain Raft’s debut album, Strange Weekend. The reverb-drenched sonics and haze of nostalgia aren’t remotely singular (for those of you who might adore or disdain the recent chillwave trend), but Remiddi’s warmly impressionistic lyrics, which come off like the communique of a faraway friend telling us what it’s like to go there and back again, imbues his music with a more mature quality befitting of his life experience. Recently, Remiddi played at Chicago’s Metro to support Youth Lagoon, where we caught up with him before the show to chat about his travels and his ultimate settlement.
The Worldly Mauro Remiddi Finds His Place as Porcelain Raft

Thanks to Porcelain Raft for being so magnanimous with his time, considering he’d just gotten done with a photo shoot that had him and Youth Lagoon’s Trevor Powers carrying each other in arms like an overjoyed bride and groom (Powers is much, much stronger than Remiddi, who almost dropped the younger musician flat on his ass). I do really like his album, though I don’t think it came off nearly as well in concert. Layers of melodies were reduced to blocks of noise; all fragility was shattered by the first note. But I think you’re supposed to feel this one by yourself, not in a room filled with strangers.

bbook:

Mauro Remiddi, aka Porcelain Raft, has been around the block and then some. Born in 1972, he toured all over the world before recently settling in New York City, where he recorded Porcelain Raft’s debut album, Strange Weekend. The reverb-drenched sonics and haze of nostalgia aren’t remotely singular (for those of you who might adore or disdain the recent chillwave trend), but Remiddi’s warmly impressionistic lyrics, which come off like the communique of a faraway friend telling us what it’s like to go there and back again, imbues his music with a more mature quality befitting of his life experience. Recently, Remiddi played at Chicago’s Metro to support Youth Lagoon, where we caught up with him before the show to chat about his travels and his ultimate settlement.

The Worldly Mauro Remiddi Finds His Place as Porcelain Raft

Thanks to Porcelain Raft for being so magnanimous with his time, considering he’d just gotten done with a photo shoot that had him and Youth Lagoon’s Trevor Powers carrying each other in arms like an overjoyed bride and groom (Powers is much, much stronger than Remiddi, who almost dropped the younger musician flat on his ass). I do really like his album, though I don’t think it came off nearly as well in concert. Layers of melodies were reduced to blocks of noise; all fragility was shattered by the first note. But I think you’re supposed to feel this one by yourself, not in a room filled with strangers.

Notes

  1. ish8calabash reblogged this from bbook
  2. discoblood reblogged this from bbook
  3. notarobotbutaghost reblogged this from bbook and added:
    An album I’ve been playing a lot lately. Definitely going to be on heavy rotation as the summer months approach.
  4. mike-carm reblogged this from bbook
  5. airgordon reblogged this from bbook and added:
    Thanks to Porcelain Raft for being so magnanimous with his time, considering he’d just gotten done with a photo shoot...
  6. nicotinehymnal reblogged this from bbook
  7. bbook posted this